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Make It Happen Tipsheet

  • Increasing Newsletter Registrations

    Increasing Newsletter Registrations

    Are you really satisfied with the response rate of your newsletter registration form on your website?  Do you think that, just maybe, your list could be bigger? Instead of thinking of the sign-up form as a sign-up form, think of it as a transaction.  The user - a prospective client [More]

  • Trust: Earning the Right to Ask

    Trust: Earning the Right to Ask

    How often have you walked in a shop, only to feel pressured into buying something you didn't really want?  Perhaps you were at a restaurant, and the waiter actually sits down at your table, introduces him or herself, and asks for your order? Or maybe you found yourself in the [More]

  • Three Blog Archetypes: Writing for Results

    Three Blog Archetypes: Writing for Results

    Have you noticed that each magazine, newspaper, and TV news show has its own style?  They do so because style builds brand equity with their target audience.  But look underneath the glitz of style, these pros have structured each story almost exactly the same. Or in other words, every episode [More]

  • Methodology, Standardization, Effectiveness, and Efficiency

    Methodology, Standardization, Effectiveness, and Efficiency

    Have you ever wondered how Starbucks, Mcdonalds, or any global retailer guarantees both consistent service and consistent food quality?  Or how KPMG, Baker & McKenzie, or any global advisory firm provides the same quality of work, no matter the jurisdiction? Behind every successful french fry, coffee, or advisory engagement is [More]

  • Insight: Objectivity or the Information Bubble

    Insight: Objectivity or the Information Bubble

    In the 1930s, there were two primary news sources:  radio and the newspaper.  They sent their correspondents around the world to gather news.  These journalists would see and hear, verify and corroborate, investigate, and then expertly and objectively file their reports. The reader (or listener) would know that an editor [More]

  • Exceeding Expectations

    Exceeding Expectations

    Two people walk into the campground office. The park ranger warns that there are bears - and that it is dangerous. The first camper quickly replies - "that won't be a problem". The ranger says, "I hope you can run fast - very fast".  "Not really," the camper replied. "But [More]

  • Does it (Google) Translate?

    Does it (Google) Translate?

    If you are reading this, the chances are very high that you understand English. But what if you didn't? What if your target audience didn't? Or what if your target audience did understand, but felt more comfortable in their own mother tongue? The obvious solution: translate your content. The not-so-obvious [More]

  • CASL:  Six Name Recapture Strategies

    CASL: Six Name Recapture Strategies

    Canadians are (supposedly) no longer receiving non-consensual emails, as these are no longer allowed under Canadian Anti-Spam law (CASL).  Yet spam continues to pour in from overseas - as do "legitimate" marketing emails from organizations outside of the country.  Seemingly, the only losers are the businesses that actually comply.  If [More]

  • Real World or Digital

    Real World or Digital

    Despite the near ubiquity of Social Media, you can't say hello to your Starbucks barista there.  Putting aside Zoom, which isn't Social Media anyway, you can't see your team's body language during a meeting.  You can't celebrate with friends and family in real-time.  Everything seems to be in 2D - [More]

  • CASL: Double Opt-in is not Express Consent (and vice-versa)

    CASL: Double Opt-in is not Express Consent (and vice-versa)

    With seven-digit penalties, many marketers are looking carefully at how they are addressing the Canada Anti-Spam Law (CASL) and similar legislation in other parts of the world. Unfortunately, many are making a critical error that may later haunt them - and cost.  They are assuming that an email "double-opt-in" constitutes Express [More]

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