Make It Happen
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Self-promotion

by Randall Craig on April 4, 2006

Filed in: Blog, Career Planning, Make It Happen Tipsheet,

Tagged as: , , ,

Almost everyone dreams of getting that big promotion, yet for most people the goal is elusive, and infrequently occurring. So what is the secret of getting the bigger chair, private office, and higher salary?

The big secret is that there is no big secret. When someone is promoted, “everyone” thinks they know the reason: luck, strong relationship with the boss, right place at the right time, and so on. We are also led to believe that hard work and long hours will make it happen. In some organizations, and for some people, these factors all play a role, but let me suggest that there is something else going on.

The first time I was promoted into the management ranks, I asked my boss why he promoted me. His answer? “I promoted you to a manager because you are already a manager.” When I looked around, I realized that the scope of my responsibilities were very much the same as the managers around me.

If you are looking for a promotion, or at least some recognition, the key is to look around: who is modeling the behavior of a manager? How have those who’ve recently been promoted stepped up to the plate, and can you do likewise?

Self-promotion doesn’t mean bragging or tooting your own horn. And it certainly doesn’t mean politics. Self-promotion means spending the time to model yourself into a great manager, and then deliver like a great manager, before you actually are one. The fastest way to getting that promotion is self-promotion – but of a decidedly different kind!

Note: The Make It Happen Tipsheet is also available by email. Go to www.RandallCraig.com to register.

Randall Craig

@RandallCraig (follow me)
www.RandallCraig.com
:  Professional credentials site
www.108ideaspace
.com: Web strategy, technology, and development
www.ProfessionallySpeakingTV.com
:  Interviews with the nation’s thought-leaders

Lead from behind

by Randall Craig on March 28, 2006

Filed in: Blog, Make It Happen Tipsheet, Management,

Tagged as:

Much has been written about leadership, but what makes a great follower? In fact, who even wants to be known as a follower?

Being a follower brings up a terribly unhealthy picture: you are uncreative, require close management, have little intellectual capability – and certainly have no leadership potential. While this might be true for some followers (and, admittedly, some leaders too), it isn’t true for many.

An influental mentor once described to me the challenge of managing a large organization: “We may appear to be like the Queen Mary, but we must act like a flotilla of speedboats”. Speedboats can turn on a dime, and respond instantly to changes in the environment around them. Speedboat captains are constantly aware of the leadership vision, the business dynamic, and must be prepared to execute with excellence.

Consider this in the context of your Follower role on a team: do you see yourself as a “deckhand”, or as a speedboat captain? Think of your current team(s): if being a Follower meant being a speedboat captain (instead of a deckhand), would your attitude and actions be any different?

What makes a great Follower? Simple – the same thing that makes a great Leader. Followership means leading – but in this case, leading from behind.

Note: The Make It Happen Tipsheet is also available by email. Go to www.RandallCraig.com to register.

Randall Craig

@RandallCraig (follow me)
www.RandallCraig.com
:  Professional credentials site
www.108ideaspace
.com: Web strategy, technology, and development
www.ProfessionallySpeakingTV.com
:  Interviews with the nation’s thought-leaders

Two ears and one mouth

by Randall Craig March 14, 2006

Did you ever wonder how children can so quickly learn new things? And ever hear the expression “Children should be seen, and not heard”? Maybe there is a connection between these two concepts that can help us be better managers. Consider: it is 100% impossible to learn from others if you are the only one […]

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Sweat the Small Stuff

by Randall Craig March 7, 2006

Several years ago. I decided to change my voice message to one that ended with an enthusiastic “Have a Great Day”. Soon afterward, something funny started happening. When clients and colleagues left messages, they invariably ended with “Have a Great Day” too! This got me thinking about how something as simple as a changed greeting […]

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